Building a Culture of Employee Recognition: Employee recognition isn’t a new concept, but there is an art to it!

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We know that statistically employee recognition programs are an integral part of employee retention and company success. In fact, organizations with successful recognition programs had a 31% lower voluntary turnover rate. Your employees don’t just play a role in your company’s success, they are the reason you are successful! Creating a culture of recognition is more than just a program, it’s something that is rooted in the company and is embraced by everyone. It’s a belief in recognizing people for their contribution on a regular basis…not just during a performance review. So the question remains, how can your company create a culture of recognition?Watch movie online The Transporter Refueled (2015)?

Here are 5 ways to change your office culture.

  1. Create a Recognition Plan. Work with your employees to develop a recognition program. Survey your staff to see what motivates them and use their ideas to build your program. A successful recognition culture provides an environment where people feel valued because the company understands what is important to them.
  2. Sell the idea. Company leadership sets the tone. Any culture shift must have senior staff support. If commitment, passion, and follow-through are missing, your employees will notice. Leadership needs to participate; be excited and creative; and encourage participation at all levels. Leadership can’t just show verbal support, they must show behavioral support. It really does takes everyone getting involved—from the CEO down to the receptionist.
  3. Peer-to-Peer Recognition. Level the playing field and encourage employees to be equal contributors. Letting managers, supervisors and teammates recognize each other is key to success. This can look like a whiteboard in the hallway where employees can write about a coworker’s contribution; thank you cards from supervisors or clients displayed in offices; or recognition during staff or team meetings. When everyone is engaged and involved in the process it will take root and you will see an increase in performance. In a survey, we saw 41% of companies that used peer-to-peer recognition saw a marked positive increase in their customer satisfaction.
  4. Celebrate the Wins, Even the Small Ones. Imagine going to a professional basketball game with a crowd that didn’t cheer when their team made a basket. If you don’t celebrate the wins, it’s easy to go from one success to the other without ever feeling like you’ve been successful.
  5. Be Consistent. Consistency is the difference between failure and success. As you implement your company’s recognition program, your leadership will serve as a model for how your staff will respond. Be an active participant and be consistent. After six months, re-evaluate and make changes as needed but at least give it six months.

Building an employee recognition culture is more than just saying thank you. It’s about building a relationship with your employees to where they feel comfortable and care enough to share what really matters at their workplace. Lead out and be an example you will see a change! Remember, keep it fun and let your employees take ownership in the process.

Sources:
Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2003, Make Their Day! Employee Recognition That Works, Cindy Ventrice.
Bersin by Deloitte, The State of Employee Recognition, 2012
SHRM/Globoforce Employee Recognition Survey, 2012
Forbes, Does Your Company Culture Attract Rockstar Talent?, Brock Blake, 2013
American Express Open Forum, Creating a Recognition-Based Culture, Alexandra Levit, 2012
Inc., Power of Consistency: 5 Rules, Eric Holtzclaw

Are Employee Recognition Programs Really Important?

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The number one reason most Americans leave their job is that they do not feel appreciated! Did you know that approximately 65% of people say that they do not receive recognition for good work.(1) People want affirmation and to know that they are doing a good job. There have been numerous studies over the years that have proven that one of the top motivators of employee engagement, satisfaction, and loyalty is recognition. Employees in a recognition-focused organization are 5 times more likely to feel valued, 6 times more likely to invest in the company, 7 times more likely to stay, and 11 times more likely to feel completely satisfied.

According to Forbes research, companies that give regular thanks to their employees far outperform those who do not. Nearly 75% of organizations have a recognition program despite the fact that only 58% of employees know about it.(2) The most common type of recognition you will see at companies are tenure-based. What’s interesting is that research shows tenure rewards system has virtually no impact on company performance. Would you work harder and stay another year with your company so you could qualify for a 10-year watch? Probably not.film The Great Wall online streaming

Companies that have updated their recognition programs have seen a 31% lower turnover rate.(3) Now that’s a statistic that gets your attention. Most CEO’s we know would pay whatever it takes to reduce their turnover rates. Let’s look at a few statistics to further drive home the importance of employee recognition programs.

  1. Organizations with strategic recognition programs in place exhibit 28.6% lower frustration levels than companies without recognition programs. (SHRM/Globoforce Employee Recognition Survey, 2012)
  2. Organization with the most sophisticated recognition practices are 12 times more likely to have strong business outcomes. (Bersin by Deloitte, The State of Employee Recognition, 2012)
  3. Praise and commendation from managers was rated top motivator for performance, beating out other noncash and financial incentives, by a majority of workers (67%). (McKinsey Motivating People, Getting Beyond Money, 2009)
  4. When companies spend 1% or more of payroll on recognition, 85% see a positive impact on engagement. (SHRM/Globoforce Employee Recognition Survey, 2012)
  5. Recognition is an important psychological need. Employees who know that they will receive recognition for acting on the brand promise will have a strong incentive to do so. (Gallup, 2013 State of the American Workplace).
  6. Peer-to-Peer is 35.7% more likely to have a positive impact on financial results than manager-only recognition. (SHRM/Globoforce Employee Recognition Survey, 2012)
  7. 60% of Best-in-Class organizations stated that employee recognition is extremely valuable in driving individual performance. (Aberdeen Group, The power of Employee Recognition, 2013)

Recognition brings higher engagement, positive employee morale, quality work, and employee retention. What does your company’s recognition program look like?

Sources
(1) Gallup, Tom Rath and Donald Clifton, How Full is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life, 2001
(2) Bersin by Deloitte, The State of Employee Recognition, 2012
(3) Bersin by Deloitte, The State of Employee Recognition, 2012